3 ways to overcome your fear of speaking Spanish

3 ways to overcome your fear of speaking Spanish

Learning and actually speaking in another language is a pretty big deal. It’s a massive change for you in so many ways and massive changes can be scary. Check out these 3 ways to overcome your fear of speaking Spanish…

 

When you are embarking on learning a new language, you instantly feel like a child again: you lack the words to express yourself and must struggle to put up a face of dignity while being intensely self-critical of your language abilities.

Your perception is also that the other person you are speaking with is judging you, that your mistakes are making you look dumb, and that your inability to communicate well somehow reflects a lack of self-worth.

A voice in your head says something along the lines of “don’t speak, you’ll come across as stupid,” and, often, especially as a beginner, you tend to obey that internal little voice. Even worse, we imagine others are believing you are stupid when you speak and that talking to you is a pain.

However, you can never progress as a serious student of Spanish unless you venture out in social situations and actively use the language you’ve been learning. When you find yourself trapped in self-doubt, you must move forward, exert self-confidence and become a proficient foreign language speaker who is daily conquering the small obstacles to Spanish fluency.

Beginners are not the only ones susceptible to these moments of vulnerability, more advanced speakers get tripped up with intimidating social situations and suffer from moments of feeling unintelligent.

Don’t fear – whether you are a beginner or an advanced student, here are 3 ways to overcome your fear of speaking Spanish so that you can communicate with dignity.

 

Fear of speaking Spanish

 

1. Accept the Fear

 

You may believe that fluent speakers of Spanish don’t experience fear, that one day you’ll have accumulated enough language knowledge to not be scared of being judged negatively when you speak. The truth is that more experienced speakers, and even native speakers of Spanish, can feel intimidated by the act of communicating in the foreign language.

Fear is a fact of life and when you count yourself among those who regularly make an effort to master their fear, you are well on your way to significantly advancing in your mastery of the foreign language.

Mark Twain once said that courage is the resistance of fear, not the absence of fear. Facing your fear on a daily basis is the path to overcoming it, and as you do so, you will realize that the monsters you imagined were never real and created by your own imagination.

So start by taking small steps in leaving your comfort zone by practicing Spanish with native speakers. With practice, you will realize that it’s no big deal after all.

 

2. Embrace Speaking Spanish as a Fun, Daily Habit

 

Practiced learners of Spanish understand you have to apply what you study in daily life and create genuine experiences with the language. The best method of doing this is to practice the language in a practical, fun and convenient manner.

The more you embrace practicing Spanish in your daily life, the easier it will be to find your inner courage to speak it. This is where traditional methods of learning the language can work against you. Traditional methods typically focus too much on grammar while placing little emphasis on the experience of learning Spanish in a live action environment.

Some methods for actively learning Spanish are: listening to Spanish music and Spanish podcasts, watching movies and TV in the language, and engaging with native speakers online and in person.

When you start learning Spanish in an actionable way on a daily basis, you will experience the following:

• You will start feeling calm and relaxed in social situations despite not understanding everything.

• The Spanish learning process gets easier as you grow accustomed to the rhythms and sounds of the language.

• You will grow more enthused about the learning process as you participate in more and more authentic learning experiences.

 

3. Master Greetings and Goodbyes

 

A terrific way to overcome your fear of speaking Spanish is to master your hellos and goodbyes beyond the simplest forms of opening and ending a conversation.

Your greetings and goodbyes are used in every face-to-face situation and when you become practiced enough in starting and ending a conversation, you experience moments of perfect comprehension, which makes all the difference for your confidence level.

If you can make a reliably solid first and final impression when you connect with a person at the beginning and end of a conversation, you’re more likely to tap into your inner sense of confidence that will slowly extend to the rest of the conversation with practice.

You will be able to connect with native speakers of Spanish in a friendly and natural way which will predispose them to helping you with your Spanish. You will begin and end every conversation on a positive, high note which will make you feel good about yourself. With just a handful of phrases and an ear for the typical responses, you can start and end every conversation with fluency, confidence and dignity.

Your repertoire of greetings in Spanish can include: “Qué tal?” (How are you?); “Cómo andas?” (How are you doing?); “Todo bien?” (Is everything okay?). Your list of simple goodbyes can feature: “Que descanses,” (May you rest well); “Fue lindo hablar contigo,” (It was good talking to you); “Que tengas un lindo dia/viaje/(una linda) semana,” (Have a nice day/trip/week); and “Hasta luego,” (Until later).

These greetings and goodbyes instantly enable you to connect with any Spanish speaker in a fun and dynamic fashion.

 

Sean HopwoodArticle by Sean Hopwood

Sean Hopwood, MBA is founder and President of Day Translations, Inc., a Spanish translation services provider, dedicated to the improvement of global communications. By helping both corporations and the individual, Day Translations provides a necessary service at the same time as developing opportunities for greater sympathy and understanding worldwide.

5 fun and alternative ways of learning Spanish

5 fun and alternative ways of learning Spanish

You can get a helping hand with Spanish translation services and resources online, but if you’re not real big on text book learning, check out these five fun and alternative ways of learning Spanish…

 

Spanish is a fun language to learn. Beyond the fact that it’s the second most widely spoken language in the world, it’s also arguably one of the sexiest sounding. Especially when you get further into your language learning journey and can hear the differences in accents and understand regional dialects.

 

1. Study Abroad

 

Learning Spanish in the classroom is not the same as speaking it on the streets of Madrid or dancing flamenco in a bar in Seville. So, go study abroad. Take a year out and practice your Spanish outside of a school. Not only will the phrases you learn make more sense as you use them in real-life situations, but you’ll make friends and have fun at the same time.

OK, so not everybody has the luxury of taking a year abroad to learn Spanish, but if budget is a problem, then do some part time work online while you’re there. If you can’t take that much time out from your busy schedule, then organize a vacation. Try to go off the beaten path to places where English isn’t widely spoken, so you’ll be forced to speak more than you might do otherwise.

 

learn spanish abroad

 

2. Take Dance Classes

 

Dance classes? Yes, dance classes. Depending on the variant you want to learn, Spanish speaking countries are pretty much all big on dancing. From the stomping heels of a sultry flamenco and the melancholy mystique of a tango, to upbeat salsa beats; learning the Spanish language almost inevitably means that you’ll have to learn to dance at some point. So, you might as well get a head start.

The best thing about taking dance classes is that you’ll meet like-minded people who want to have fun and you’ll pick up Spanish vocab without even trying. Learning the lyrics of the songs and being taught by a native teacher will make you want to look up “will you dance with me?” in Spanish. And who knows where that may lead you? Alternative and fun!

 

3. Watch Your Favorite Shows in Spanish

 

Whether you prefer to watch your favorite shows in English with Spanish subtitles, or go down the dubbed route, this is a great way of improving your Spanish. Why? Because you get to throw the accompanying CD of your text book out the window and watch and listen to something that interests you instead.

You probably won’t understand a word in the beginning. It helps if you watch the show in English first and the dubbed version afterwards, then things will fall into place. You don’t even have to watch something that you can’t stand, like a Mexican novela – just go for a rerun on Gray’s Anatomy and try not to snigger at the Spanish speaking version of Meredith.

 

learn spanish television

 

4. Read What You Enjoy

 

Another way of rebelling against the typical structure of a text book is by reading about what you enjoy in Spanish. Thanks to Amazon and other online vendors, you can pretty much get the book of your choice in Spanish these days. So, if you’re not really interested in Don Quixote, then how about trying Eat, Pray, Love? If you’re interested in fashion, pick up a woman’s magazine.

If you want to know more about stocks and shares, try looking at a Spanish newspaper, such as El Pais or ABC. Actually, reading newspapers may not be fun for everyone, but they’re a lot easier than reading gossip magazines, as the formal way they’re written shares the common Latin thread with English. Your confidence will be greatly boosted as you find out you know more than you think you did.

 

5. Get a boyfriend or girlfriend

 

This part (obviously) only applies to you if you’re single. I’m not advocating adultery here. But, let’s be honest. Hands down, the single best way to learn a language is when you’re fully invested in learning it. And there’s no better way than by going out with someone who only speaks that language, namely Spanish.

You’ll learn all kinds of vocabulary that you’d never learn from a textbook and you’ll also get a real slice of Spanish culture. A family gathering for Sunday lunch, a cousin’s birthday party or maybe even an infamous “quinceañera”. Getting a partner who’s a Spanish speaker will be a wild ride and guaranteed to ignite your passion for the language and lifestyle even further.

 

 

So, there you have it. If you’re struggling with your pronunciation, reading lengthy passages, or getting stumped at the subjunctive, then take a tip from me. There are more fun and alternative ways of learning Spanish. You just need an open mind and a positive attitude. And a pair of dancing shoes.

fun and alternative ways of learning Spanish dancing

Sean HopwoodArticle by Sean Hopwood

Sean is founder and President of Day Translations, Inc., an online translation agency and localization services provider, dedicated to the improvement of global communications. By helping both corporations and the individual, Day Translations provides a necessary service at the same time as developing opportunities for greater sympathy and understanding worldwide.

Language learning app HelloTalk

language learning app hellotalk

We would like to introduce you to a great language learning app HelloTalk.

HelloTalk is available for Android or iOS.

HelloTalk enables you to connect with native speakers directly from your smartphone or tablet, quickly and simply. You can speak to them, send them text messages, share photos; even share little doodles.

HelloTalk is the world’s premier language exchange social networking app. It is a tried and tested application that has been around since 2011. This year it announced that it had reached the 1 million registered global users mark. Currently HelloTalk supports over 100 languages (see below for a list of languages supported) with users from over 200 countries.

Access to native speakers is vital to any learner of a second language. It is the only way to properly learn a language. But not everyone can just go and live (or even take a holiday) in their country of choice. Thankfully now we have modern technology to facilitate easy access to native speakers all around the world.

language learning app hellotalk for tablets and smartphones

There are opportunities via other websites and apps to arrange language exchanges or take regular lessons with a qualified teacher. And you can do so using any number of communication tools such as Skype or Google Hangouts. But with the specialised language learning app HelloTalk you have everything you need in one handy package.

HelloTalk is an amazing tool for the foreign language student. And what’s more it’s free!!

Premium paid extras include translation, voice recognition, and transliteration. These are fantastic extras, but the basic free package is perfectly excellent as a standalone app.

HelloTalk is like Whatsapp PLUS a substantial database of foreign language partners all ready, willing and able to help you practice your chosen foreign language.

Next to each user you will see a flag to indicate their location, allowing you to choose people to practise specific language requirements (e.g. Castellano Spanish or Latin American).

great language learning app hellotalk

HelloTalk provides a simple, intuitive, real-time experience where users teach each other their respective native languages. It works on both Android and iOS, so it’s ideal for users of Android smartphones or tablets, iPhones, or iPads.

Here at TheSpanishBlog.com we have always championed learning Spanish primarily by engaging and interacting with native speakers in situations that are as natural and realistic as possible. Sound knowledge of grammar, vocabulary and expressions is essential, but it is just as vital to practice what you are learning with native speakers so that you know how to use things correctly and authentically.

Students who study solely using textbooks stand out like a sore thumb. There will be a long list of give-aways that they are not a native speaker. For example, a lack expressions, idioms and slang, artificial and awkward use of grammar, poor choice of vocabulary, and foreign-sounding pronunciation.

HelloTalk is a compact tool that opens up a world of possibilities to someone who is interested in learning foreign languages. With this fantastic language learning app HelloTalk there are really are no reasons why you can’t take your chosen foreign language to the highest levels and become truly bilingual.

Another really handy tool with the HelloTalk app is that you can share your GPS location to make it easier to find language partners in your area. You may not wish to do this of course, but it can be really nice to find local language partners who you can occasionally meet up with in person to practice face to face conversation. With over a million HelloTalk users there is a good chance of finding someone nearby.

This can be a great option if you are travelling abroad and fancy getting tips and advice from locals.

So why not try out the language learning app HelloTalk for yourself. Go to the Android or iOS store to install it.

Learn more about HelloTalk:


Languages Supported:

Afrikaans, Albanian, Arabic, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Basque, Belarusian, Bengali, Bosnian, Bulgarian, Catalan, Cantonese, Cebuano, Chinese Simplified, Chinese Traditional, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, French, Galician, Georgian, German, Greek, Gujarati, Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hebrew, Hindi, Hmong, Hungarian, Icelandic, Igbo, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Kannada, Khmer, Korean, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Maltese, Maori, Marathi, Mongolian, Nepali, Norwegian, Persian, Polish, Portuguese, Punjabi, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Somali, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Tamil, Telugu, Thai, Turkish, Ukrainian, Urdu, Vietnamese, Welsh, Yiddish, Yoruba, Zulu.

Differences between Canarian and Castilian Spanish

Just like any other country, individual regions in Spain each have their own idiosyncratic dialects, full of words, phrases and grammatical constructions that may make the regular non-native Castilian speaker think ‘what on earth….?’

Spain’s Canary Islands are no exception to this rule. For those thinking of studying or living in Tenerife, La Gomera, Fuerteventura or one of the other idyllic, sunny spots – picking up a few of the ‘Canarismos’ can help you start off on the right foot when speaking Spanish to the natives.

la gomera photo

Here are a few of the main differences in Canarian Spanish to get you started:

First up, Canarians have a few distinctive words in their vocabulary. Where these words come from varies; some words are from Latin America, some Portugal and some the UK. Just as emigrants from the Canary Islands settled in Latin America and brought over their version of Spanish, so the Latin American influence is strong in the language of the Canaries today, with words like ‘guagua’ (which means bus). Throw a few of these Canarian-specific words into your everyday Spanish conversation and you’ll have the locals well and truly convinced:

Machango: joker, cotufas: popcorn, rasca: drunkenness, tennis: sports shoes, trabas: hairpins, chacho: to express surprise (a shortened form of muchacho), chachi = good or nice, fisco or fisquito = a small amount or little bit.

You’ll notice that Canarian speakers employ some Anglicisms which aren’t used elsewhere on the mainland or in Latin America. This is thanks to (or the fault of) English speaking expats who have fled the dreary skies of their homelands and settled on the sunnier, Canarian shores. One example is the word “quinegua” which is used for potatoes and comes from the English word “King Edward”. Another if ‘naife’ which is the English word ‘knife’ pronounced with a little more Spanish flair.

Secondly, pronunciation on the Canary Island varies in some prominent ways from Castilian Spanish. Castilian speakers generally pronounce words with the letter ‘c’ or letter ‘z’ with a ‘th’ sound, such as in words like ‘zapatos’. Canarian speakers, however, pronounce these letters with an ‘s’, such as in ‘cenar’ which, in the Canary Islands, is pronounced ‘senar’. The letter ‘j’ as in ‘jose’ is also generally pronounced with a soft ‘h’ sound as in ‘horse’. This is very similar to the pronunciation of their Latin American counterparts.

There are also grammar differences in Canarian Spanish. Generally Castilian speakers use ‘de’ to indicate possession, such as in ‘casa de Jose’ or ‘Hotel de Maria’. On the Canary Islands, you’ll see signs which omit the ‘de’ so it reads simply ‘casa Jose’. Some verbs may also be used in a different sense than what you are used to if you have already learned Castilian Spanish. For example, in the phrase “¡Que tienen suerte!” the verb changes to become “¡Que hayan suerte!” The preterit is generally employed on the Canary Islands to describe the past, even the recent past, whereas in Castilian Spanish they would employ the perfect tense. So to say ‘I have travelled to America’ (recently), they would say “Ya viajé a los Estados Unidos”.

Finally, Canarian speakers will generally avoid ‘vosotros’ for the plural ‘you’ and use ‘ustedes’ in almost all situations (except in La Gomera and La Palma).

The accent: The deje of Canarian Spanish is much softer and more sensual than Castilian Spanish, and is favoured by those on the mainland, meaning if you master it you’ll have Castilian speakers going weak at the knees.

Studying in the Canary Islands

The benefits of island-based study generally include cheaper priced schools and also a relaxed, beach lifestyle. The downsides, however, can be that the strong tourism industry means most natives speak English and are reluctant to converse with you in their native tongue. If you’re planning to move to the Canaries, however, then it’s probably best to study here so you can get used to the accent; Canary Islanders do have a tendency to run words together and it may take a while to get used to.

la gomera photo

La Gomera is one of the most beautiful and unvisited of the islands, and has a few good quality language schools. I.D.E.A Language School comes highly recommended, and is situated in La Calera, from where you can see fantastic views of the sea and the banana plantations. You can’t reach La Gomera directly by air, however, but you can find more information on getting there safely here (it usually involves a boat from Tenerife).

Another less-touristy option is the Fuerteventura Spanish School, which offers 20 small-group classes for 195 euros per week. The school is in Puerto Del Rosario, and quite close to Caleta de Fuste which is a fantastic watersports location with great beaches and restaurants (more details on things to do in the area can be found here).

If you’re on a budget, Gran Canaria is your best bet; the higher number of language schools in Las Palmas means that prices are brought down by competition.

Studied in the Canary Islands before? Where did you go? Let us know below!

Photo by cortto

Photo by Thomas Tolkien

Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Lesson 36: Using Spanish Reflexive Verbs with El Presente Continuo

A video lesson from the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course which practices the 69 topics of the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Theory Course.

This is the 36th Spanish lesson in the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course. This is an interactive Spanish video where you have the opportunity to practice Spanish at pre-intermediate level with a native Spanish speaker.

In this interactive Spanish video lesson you have the chance to try out making sentences in Spanish using Spanish Reflexive Verbs with El Presente Continuo – The Spanish Present Continuous. This is the fourth video lesson in this series looking at the Spanish Present Continuous grammar tense El Presente Continuo. In previous lessons we looked at how to conjugate regular and irregular Spanish verbs with El Presente Continuo and how to make sentences using typical Spanish verbs that are not “reflexive”. Reflexive Spanish verbs end in “Se” and the object and subject of the sentence is the same. If you are not too sure about Reflexive Spanish Verbs I suggest you take a look at some of the video lessons in the Beginner and Beginner Practice courses which explain how to use them in detail.

Please try to watch the video first before looking at the lesson notes. Answers to all tasks involved in the lesson will be given at the end of the post. Try not to look at the answers until you have tried a good few times to give your own responses.

This lesson practices the information taught in Pre-Intermediate Spanish Lesson 36 from my Pre-Intermediate Spanish Course.

Lesson notes:

Crea frases en Presente Continuo con la persona y el verbo reflexivo que te doy:

Create sentences using El Presente Continuo and the person and the Spanish reflexive verb I give you. For example, if I say “Yo/levantarse”, you should say “Me estoy levantando” or “Estoy levantándome” which means “I am getting up”. If I say “question” then you should make the intonation of a question. For example with “Tú/levantarse” (question) you should say “¿Estás levantándote?” or “¿Te estás levantando?” which means “Are you getting up?”:

1. Ellos / ducharse

2. Vosotros / despertarse (question)

3. Yo / peinarse

4. Nosotros / relajarse

5. Usted / levantarse (question)

6. Tú / lavarse los dientes (question)

7. Ustedes / lavarse el pelo (question)

8. Él / despertarse

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ANSWERS

1. Se están duchando / Están duchándose
2.¿Os estáis despertando? / ¿Estáis despertándoos?
3. Me estoy peinando / Estoy peinándome
4. Nos estamos relajando / Estamos relajándonos
5.¿Usted se está levantando? / ¿Están levantándose?
6.¿Te estás lavando los dientes? / ¿Estás lavándote los dientes?
7. ¿Ustedes se están lavando el pelo? / ¿Están lavándose el pelo?
8. Se está despertando / Está despertándose

Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Lesson 35: Making Spanish sentences using El Presente Continuo

A video lesson from the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course which practices the 69 topics of the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Theory Course.

This is the 35th Spanish lesson in the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course. This is an interactive Spanish video where you have the opportunity to practice Spanish at pre-intermediate level with a native Spanish speaker.

In this interactive Spanish video lesson you will have the opportunity to test your knowledge of how to make Spanish sentences using El Presente Continuo – The Spanish Present Continuous. This is the third video lesson in this series looking at the Spanish Present Continuous grammar tense El Presente Continuo. In previous lessons we looked at how to conjugate regular and irregular Spanish verbs with El Presente Continuo and now we will test you to see if you remember which verbs are regular and which are irregular and how to conjugate each one to make correct Spanish sentences using El Present Continuo.

Please try to watch the video first before looking at the lesson notes. Answers to all tasks involved in the lesson will be given at the end of the post. Try not to look at the answers until you have tried a good few times to give your own responses.

This lesson practices the information taught in Pre-Intermediate Spanish Lesson 35: Making Spanish sentences using El Presente Continuo from my Pre-Intermediate Spanish Course.

Lesson notes:

Crea frases en El Presente Continuo con la persona y el verbo que te doy:

Create sentences using El Presente Continuo and the person and the verb I give you. For example, if I say “Yo/comer”, you should say “Estoy comiendo” which means “I am eating”. If I say “question” then you should make the intonation of a question. For example with “Tú/comer” (question) you should say “¿Estás comiendo?” which means “Are you eating?”:

1. Tú / trabajar (question)

2. Nosotros / beber cerveza

3. Ellos / vivir con Ana

4. Usted / hablar con Carlos (question)

5. Yo / servir la sopa

6. Ella / leer el periódico

7. Ustedes /reir (question)

8. Vosotros / comprar la comida (question)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ANSWERS

1. ¿Estás trabajando?
2. Nosotros estamos bebiendo cerveza
3. Ellos están viviendo con Ana
4. ¿Usted está hablando con Carlos?
5. Yo estoy sirviendo la sopa
6. Ella está leyendo el periódico
7. ¿Ustedes están riendo?
8. ¿Vosotros estáis comprando la comida?

Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Lesson 34: Practice using irregular Spanish gerunds

A video lesson from the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course which practices the 69 topics of the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Theory Course.

This is the 34th Spanish lesson in the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course. This is an interactive Spanish video where you have the opportunity to practice Spanish at pre-intermediate level with a native Spanish speaker.

In this interactive Spanish video lesson we will review how to use irregular Spanish gerunds (gerundios) with the Spanish Present Continuous El Presente Continuo. Gerunds are verbs ending in -ing in English and are verbs used with the Present Continuous tense to describe what you are doing in that moment. In Spanish there are clear rules for conjugating regular Spanish gerunds that finish in -ar, -er, or -ir and we looked at them in the previous video lesson in this course (Spanish verbs finishing in either -ando or -iendo). Now we will practice making and using the exceptions to the general rules – the irregular Spanish gerunds / gerundios.

Please try to watch the video first before looking at the lesson notes. Answers to all tasks involved in the lesson will be given at the end of the post. Try not to look at the answers until you have tried a good few times to give your own responses.

This lesson practices the information taught in Pre-Intermediate Spanish Lesson 34: Practice using the Spanish Present Continuous from my Pre-Intermediate Spanish Course.

Lesson notes:

Traduce los siguientes gerundios irregulares de español a inglés:

Translate the following irregular gerunds (gerunds are verbs ending in -ing) from Spanish to English:

1. Riendo
2. Leyendo
3. Trayendo
4. Diciendo
5. Durmiendo
6. Mintiendo
7. Yendo
8. Siguiendo

Ahora pon en gerundio los siguientes verbos:

Now turn the following irregular verbs into gerunds:

1. Oir
2. Preferir
3. Morir
4. Poder
5. Reir
6. Leer
7. Servir
8. Destruir

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ANSWERS

1. Laughing
2. Reading
3. Bringing
4. Saying
5. Sleeping
6. Lying
7. Going
8. Following

1. Oyendo
2. Prefiriendo
3. Muriendo
4. Pudiendo
5. Riendo
6. Leyendo
7. Sirviendo
8. Destruyendo

Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Lesson 33: Practice using the Spanish Present Continuous

A video lesson from the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course which practices the 69 topics of the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Theory Course.

This is the 33rd Spanish lesson in the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course. This is an interactive Spanish video where you have the opportunity to practice Spanish at pre-intermediate level with a native Spanish speaker.

In this interactive Spanish video lesson we will review how to make gerunds in Spanish to be used with the Spanish Present Continuous El Presente Continuo. Gerunds are verbs ending in -ing in English and are verbs used with the Present Continuous tense to describe what you are doing in that moment. Gerunds in Spanish (Gerundios) are conjugated in a different way, but are also very simple to use – finishing in -ando or -iendo. You should be aware of the rules for conjugating gerunds in Spanish for verbs finishing in either -ar, -er, or -ir. If you cannot remember these rules then I recommend going back to the original theory lesson on this topic and reviewing them.

Please try to watch the video first before looking at the lesson notes. Answers to all tasks involved in the lesson will be given at the end of the post. Try not to look at the answers until you have tried a good few times to give your own responses.

This lesson practices the information taught in Pre-Intermediate Spanish Lesson 33: Practice using the Spanish Present Continuous from my Pre-Intermediate Spanish Course.

Lesson notes:

Traduce los siguientes gerundios de español a inglés:

Translate the following gerunds (gerunds are verbs ending in -ing) from Spanish to English:

1. Comiendo
2. Viviendo
3. Hablando
4. Trabajando
5. Corriendo
6. Escribiendo
7. Bailando
8. Comprando

Ahora pon en gerundio los siguientes verbos:

Now turn the following verbs into gerunds:

1. Salir
2. Romper
3. Llamar
4. Beber
5. Vivir
6. Comprender
7. Andar
8. Poner

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ANSWERS

1. Eating
2. Living
3. Speaking
4. Working
5. Running
6.Writing
7. Dancing
8. Buying

1. Saliendo
2. Rompiendo
3. Llamando
4. Bebiendo
5. Viviendo
6. Comprendiendo
7. Andando
8. Poniendo

Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Lesson 32: Practice giving instructions and advice in Spanish with imperatives

A video lesson from the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course which practices the 69 topics of the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Theory Course.

This is the 32nd Spanish lesson in the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course. This is an interactive Spanish video where you have the opportunity to practice Spanish at pre-intermediate level with a native Spanish speaker.

In this interactive Spanish video lesson we will practice making sentences in Spanish and understanding sentences in Spanish when giving instructions and advice using Spanish Imperatives. This is the third video lesson in a series of lessons investigating Spanish Imperatives. In the previous two video lessons we practised how to conjugate regular and irregular Spanish verbs with Spanish Imperatives when giving orders, suggestions, and instructions. Now we will see how much you remember and if you can apply the theory you have learned.

Please try to watch the video first before looking at the lesson notes. Answers to all tasks involved in the lesson will be given at the end of the post. Try not to look at the answers until you have tried a good few times to give your own responses.

This lesson practices the information taught in Pre-Intermediate Spanish Lesson 32: Practice giving instructions and advice in Spanish with imperatives from my Pre-Intermediate Spanish Course.

Lesson notes:

Repite las siguientes instrucciones usando los verbos “coger” y “girar” en imperativo:

Repeat the following instructions using the verbs “coger”(to take) and “girar” (to turn) in imperative. For example, if I say “la tercera a la derecha (usted)” you should say “coga la tercera y gire a la derecha”:

1. (usted) la segunda a la derecha
2. (tú) la primera a la izquierda
3. (vosotros) la tercera a la izquierda
4. (ustedes) la cuarta a la derecha

Ahora da consejos para los siguientes problemas usando un imperativo:

Now give advice for the following problems using an imperative:

1. Tengo mucho calor
2. No tenemos comida en casa
3. Estoy muy cansada
4. No hablo bien español
5. Me duele la cabeza
6. Tenemos frío
7. Quiero viajar a China pero está muy lejos
8. No me gusta comer pescado

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ANSWERS

1. Coga la segunda y gire a la derecha
2. Coje la primera y gira a la izquierda
3. Cojed la tercera y girad a la izquierda
4. Cojan la cuarta y giren a la derecha

(Possible answers)

1. Abre la ventana (informal)
2. Vaya a comprar comida (formal)
3. Siéntate en el sofá y relájate (informal)
4. Estudie más español (formal)
5. Tome una aspirina (formal)
6. Pónganse un abrigo (formal)
7. Viaja en avión (informal)
8. Prueba el pescado (informal)

Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Lesson 31: Practice using Irregular Spanish Imperatives

A video lesson from the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course which practices the 69 topics of the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Theory Course.

This is the 31st Spanish lesson in the Pre-Intermediate Spanish Practice Course. This is an interactive Spanish video where you have the opportunity to practice Spanish at pre-intermediate level with a native Spanish speaker.

In this interactive Spanish video lesson we will practice using irregular Spanish imperatives with orders, suggestions, and instructions. This is the second video lesson in a series of lessons looking at practising using Spanish Imperatives. In the previous video lesson practised how to conjugate regular Spanish verbs and now we will look at the exceptions to the general rules – irregular Spanish imperatives. When giving orders, suggestions, and instructions in Spanish you have to change the verb and there are specific rules which govern this with regular verbs ending in -ar, -er, and -ir. With the irregular Spanish verbs unfortunately it is just a case of having to remember how to conjugate each individual exception to the rules.

Please try to watch the video first before looking at the lesson notes. Answers to all tasks involved in the lesson will be given at the end of the post. Try not to look at the answers until you have tried a good few times to give your own responses.

This lesson practices the information taught in Pre-Intermediate Spanish Lesson 31: Practice using Irregular Spanish Imperatives from my Pre-Intermediate Spanish Course.

Lesson notes:

Voy a decir unos imperativos irregulares en español y tienes que decirme en inglés lo que he dicho:

I am going to say some irregular Spanish imperatives and I would like you to tell me what I have said in English:

1. Oiga por favor
2. Pon el libro en la mesa
3. Id a la farmacia
4. Ven al cine conmigo
5. Sal de la clase
6. Digan sus ideas
7. Tenga su billete
8. Haz la comida

Ahora voy a decir unos imperativos irregulares en inglés y tienes que traducirlos a español:

Now I am going to say a few irregular imperatives in English and I would like you to translate them to Spanish. After each one I will say “tú”, “usted”, “vosotros” or “ustedes” and you will have to choose the right ending:

1. Go with my friend (usted)
2. Say something (vosotros)
3. Put the coffee on the table (tú)
4. Leave the house (ustedes)
5. Listen to the radio (tú)
6. Make the drinks (vosotros)
7. Come with us (ustedes)
8. Have these bananas (usted)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


ANSWERS

1. Listen, please (one person/formal)
2. Put the book on the table (one person/informal)
3. Go to the pharmacy (group/informal)
4. Come to the cinema with me (one person/informal)
5. Leave the classroom (one person/informal)
6. Say your ideas (group/formal)
7. Have your ticket (one person/formal)
8. Make the food (one person/informal)

1. Vaya con mi amigo
2. Decid algo
3. Pon el café en la mesa
4. Salgan de la casa
5. Escucha la radio
6. Haced las bebidas
7. Vengan con nosotros
8. Tome estos plátanos

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